By Sunity Maharaj Published on Jan 7, 2012
7 11 mins
Caribbean Review

“Caribbean youth dream of being the best that they can be, but their dreams and aspirations…are oriented outside the Region. Some, in particular older youth, are afraid to dream because of the pain and frustration that comes from their social and economic reality and the acceptance of the fact that their dreams cannot be realised.”
—Report of the Caricom Commission on Youth Development, 2012

The heart drops like lead into water at the image of defeat summoned by these words. At a time when 60 percent of the Caribbean population is under the age of 30, is it any wonder that disillusionment is a theme of the time?
In Trinidad and Tobago and across the Caribbean, the promise of the brave New World conjured up by the Independence generation is in full retreat. Fifty years ago, that generation had discovered its identity, sense of purpose and basis for solidarity in the single idea of self-determination, powered by the dream of crafting a new and unique civilization out of the fragments of empire.

Forged from the love of liberty,
in the fires of hope…

Today, amid the detritus of collapsed hope and noble ambition, alienation stands raw before us as the enemy of nationhood, Mockingly, it reminds us that it will take much more than a flag and an anthem to transform a society designed for external control, containment and commerce, into a society with an internal propulsion for self-development and realisation.
This is the stuff of which revolutions are born. As the Arab Spring has shown, when progress demands…

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(A Meditation by LeRoy Clarke)

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By Kevin Baldeosingh

The State of Emergency proclaimed by Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar on August 21 takes the premise that authoritarian measures are necessary to stop crime. Although the assumption is that this is just a temporary suspension of citizens’ constitutional rights, it appears the Government’s approach has fallen on fertile ground. The majority of citizens seem to agree that the extreme approach is justified. One TV news poll asked viewers if they wished to know the reason behind the SoE—over 80 percent replied “No”. Even though such polls are unscientific, the fact remains that persons watching that newscast actually took the trouble to text to say they didn’t want information. The fact that the government is constitutionally mandated to provide this information adds an additional dimension to this apparent willingness among Trinidadians to abandon democracy, even if temporarily.
However, in a professional opinion poll, the World Values Survey, which was done in 2006, a full 58 percent of the respondents asserted that democracy was the preferable way to govern a country, with 27 percent instead saying that democracy was a bad system. Only 20 percent thought the army should take over the country if the government was incompetent.
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This is an edited version of an address to the 4th Biennial Business Banking and Finance Conference (BBF4) held at the Trinidad Hilton from 22nd to 24th June, 2011.
Maharaj / Jul 29
This is no easy world for workers. Once upon a time, many did not own even their own labour. Eventually worker rebellions opened the way for trade unions to enter and negotiate the terms and conditions under which labour could be used in producing goods and services owned by others pursuing the creation of wealth.
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The surge of popular protests in North Africa and the Middle East since early January that has spread from Tunisia through Egypt, Yemen, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, and Libya—with varying consequences for the regimes in these countries, including the overthrow of the pro-Western leaders Hosni Mubarak of Egypt and Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali of Tunisia, has caught many observers by surprise.
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Earl Best gives credit where it is due.

I do not habitually have difficulty believing my eyes but I awaited the arrival of Monday’s Express to confirm what I thought my eyes had seen the day before. There it was in black and white in the middle of the ODI Scoreboard that adorned the back page:

M.Wade c DM Bravo b Roach………….26

C. McKay c DM Bravo b Roach…………0

Yes, DM Bravo, not DJ! And with that one chink in the armour now gone, there is reason, I submit, to be optimistic about the future not just of the player but of the team as a whole.

The Aussies had won the final ODI game against the West Indies at St Lucia’s scenic Beausejour Cricket Ground by 30 runs to earn a draw in the five-match series. But Darren Sammy and his men had unexpectedly run the tourists very close, threatening to fashion a remarkable victory out of a near impossible situation. Still, it was not just the 92-run eighth-wicket partnership that had said very positive things about this battling West Indian side; those who watched the Australian innings would have had to be struck by the excellence of the West Indian fielding. And Darren Bravo, not DJ but DM, he of the porous hands, had actually pouched two catches.

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